BEING THERE

My shoes are grey with the ashes of the dead

it rains as we leave Auschwitz-Birkenau

A reflection of how I feel.

The hems of my trousers are splattered

with the mud of the bones, a sacrilege to wash.

The old folks always said don’t buy a Mercedes

now I feel why.

Every step is to walk not only over a grave, but

to walk the last meters that numberless thousands walked;

to view the last view they saw before they became ashes.

These roads are filled with the spirits of the unnumbered,

unnamed, uncounted, unknown.

Oh! Those Germans were meticulous record keepers

except in their haste to rid the world they neglected to count

and record…

more than we will ever know, rushed to the gas chamber

At the moment of arriving if they still lived.

The pollen falls like ashes as we stand

in the crematorium at Dachau

breaking my heart in ways for which I have no words.

Standing in these places of unimaginable horror

I can only touch the walls with the palm of my hand

and whisper”we remember” “we will not forget”.

I feel your spirits.

We can only remember, honor, teach;

somehow know what cannot be known.

My brain is full of history,

my eyes cannot hold any more horror.

With reverence and tears I spoke the Kaddish

in these holiest of places

and remembered…all the genocide, not just of these

but of our human history…ongoing still.

Author: Trienah Meyers

I am a singer, a writer, a mother, a teacher. I am learning to live life differently at this new stage of life. Adventures, food, music, books, friends, religion. Everything is interesting. Everything old is new again. I am also available to write blog posts for your business, your monthly newsletters, your speeches. Proofreading and copy editing also available.

2 thoughts on “BEING THERE”

  1. Thank you for your post. It is not something we enjoy reading about or seeing but it is something we must remember. I am 69. My mother is French, my father is American. Mom grew up as a teenager in occupied France during World War II. Later we were stationed in West Germany (with American Embassy) and I began to hear about Anne Frank and her time after capture in the concentration camp. A magazine had a story about people who were witnesses to Anne in the death camp. Shortly after, the film version of her diary was released and then I read the diary as a young teen, and watched the film. She is one of the most influential people I have ever “met.” She represents.

    1. Thank you for sharing your story and hers. All the stories are important we must never forget.

Comments are closed.